• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

British Military Current Events

Good2Golf

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
9,382
Points
1,360
Does that mean that ACM Wigston will no longer be getting fruit baskets from Beijing and Moscow?
 

Kirkhill

Army.ca Myth
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
4,110
Points
1,060


Fee Fie Foe Fum
I smell the blood of an Englishman
Be he alive or be he dead
I'll grind his bones to make my bread

Or, in the Hull context, the Yorkshire anthem, On Ilkley Moor Baht'At.

Waste not, want not. :D
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
13,039
Points
1,160

The Rag and Bone Merchant - A worthy economical pursuit by those on the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum ;)

And inextricably linked with the term 'Shoddy', interestingly enough

In the West Riding of Yorkshire, rag and bone men would collect waste woollen and rag products from householders to sell on to the Shoddy factories. 'Shoddy', cloth made from recycled wool, was first manufactured (and probably invented) by Benjamin Law in Batley, West Yorkshire, in 1813. The process involved grinding woollen rags into a fibrous mass and mixing this with some fresh wool. Law’s nephews later came up with a similar process involving felt or hard-spun woollen cloth, the product in this case being called ‘mungo’. Samuel Parr was the first producer of mungo in 1834. He used old coats and trousers, tailors clippings, ground up to produce shorter fibres than shoddy.[14] In the shoddy preparation process, the rags were sorted, and any seams, or parts of the rag not suitable, were left to rot and then sold onto to farmers to manure crops. Or they were used for bedding or stuffing. The remaining wool rags were then sent to the shoddy mills for processing.For several decades shipments of rags even arrived from continental Europe. Shoddy and mungo manufacture was, by the 1860s, a huge industry in West Yorkshire, particularly in and around the Batley, Dewsbury and Ossett areas.

 

Kirkhill

Army.ca Myth
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
4,110
Points
1,060
The Rag and Bone Merchant - A worthy economical pursuit by those on the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum ;)

And inextricably linked with the term 'Shoddy', interestingly enough

In the West Riding of Yorkshire, rag and bone men would collect waste woollen and rag products from householders to sell on to the Shoddy factories. 'Shoddy', cloth made from recycled wool, was first manufactured (and probably invented) by Benjamin Law in Batley, West Yorkshire, in 1813. The process involved grinding woollen rags into a fibrous mass and mixing this with some fresh wool. Law’s nephews later came up with a similar process involving felt or hard-spun woollen cloth, the product in this case being called ‘mungo’. Samuel Parr was the first producer of mungo in 1834. He used old coats and trousers, tailors clippings, ground up to produce shorter fibres than shoddy.[14] In the shoddy preparation process, the rags were sorted, and any seams, or parts of the rag not suitable, were left to rot and then sold onto to farmers to manure crops. Or they were used for bedding or stuffing. The remaining wool rags were then sent to the shoddy mills for processing.For several decades shipments of rags even arrived from continental Europe. Shoddy and mungo manufacture was, by the 1860s, a huge industry in West Yorkshire, particularly in and around the Batley, Dewsbury and Ossett areas.


Ee bah goom!

Where there's muck there's money!
 

OldSolduer

Army.ca Myth
Reaction score
5,132
Points
1,110
The Rag and Bone Merchant - A worthy economical pursuit by those on the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum ;)

And inextricably linked with the term 'Shoddy', interestingly enough

In the West Riding of Yorkshire, rag and bone men would collect waste woollen and rag products from householders to sell on to the Shoddy factories. 'Shoddy', cloth made from recycled wool, was first manufactured (and probably invented) by Benjamin Law in Batley, West Yorkshire, in 1813. The process involved grinding woollen rags into a fibrous mass and mixing this with some fresh wool. Law’s nephews later came up with a similar process involving felt or hard-spun woollen cloth, the product in this case being called ‘mungo’. Samuel Parr was the first producer of mungo in 1834. He used old coats and trousers, tailors clippings, ground up to produce shorter fibres than shoddy.[14] In the shoddy preparation process, the rags were sorted, and any seams, or parts of the rag not suitable, were left to rot and then sold onto to farmers to manure crops. Or they were used for bedding or stuffing. The remaining wool rags were then sent to the shoddy mills for processing.For several decades shipments of rags even arrived from continental Europe. Shoddy and mungo manufacture was, by the 1860s, a huge industry in West Yorkshire, particularly in and around the Batley, Dewsbury and Ossett areas.

Bring out yer dead!! Bring out yer dead!!

But i'm not dead yet....

Don't be such a baby....
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
4,412
Points
1,160
The Rag and Bone Merchant - A worthy economical pursuit by those on the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum ;)

And inextricably linked with the term 'Shoddy', interestingly enough

In the West Riding of Yorkshire, rag and bone men would collect waste woollen and rag products from householders to sell on to the Shoddy factories. 'Shoddy', cloth made from recycled wool, was first manufactured (and probably invented) by Benjamin Law in Batley, West Yorkshire, in 1813. The process involved grinding woollen rags into a fibrous mass and mixing this with some fresh wool. Law’s nephews later came up with a similar process involving felt or hard-spun woollen cloth, the product in this case being called ‘mungo’. Samuel Parr was the first producer of mungo in 1834. He used old coats and trousers, tailors clippings, ground up to produce shorter fibres than shoddy.[14] In the shoddy preparation process, the rags were sorted, and any seams, or parts of the rag not suitable, were left to rot and then sold onto to farmers to manure crops. Or they were used for bedding or stuffing. The remaining wool rags were then sent to the shoddy mills for processing.For several decades shipments of rags even arrived from continental Europe. Shoddy and mungo manufacture was, by the 1860s, a huge industry in West Yorkshire, particularly in and around the Batley, Dewsbury and Ossett areas.

Their white privilege is on full display
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
13,039
Points
1,160
I've spent alot of time in and about Imber, but never knew about this:

What Happened to the Lost Village of Imber?

With its simple church, quaint houses and winding lanes, at first glance, Imber looks much like any other rural English village. However, you’d be mistaken: since 1943, the once sleepy village of Imber has been the UK’s largest military training area.

Situated on a rural part of Salisbury Plain, the 94,000-acre site was requisitioned by the War Office in 1943, on the promise that it would be returned to the residents six months later. However, despite multiple campaigns, in the 70 plus years since, the villagers have never been permitted to return.


What Happened to the Lost Village of Imber?
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
13,039
Points
1,160

It's like a script from Blackadder come to life ;)

blackadder goes forth george GIF
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
13,039
Points
1,160
Streuth...


EDEN CONFIDENTIAL: Seven Sandhurst cadets and instructors from the UAE are expelled in scandal​


The Sovereign's Parade concluded in traditional manner at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst yesterday, albeit in the Queen's absence.
But I can reveal that the parade-ground pomp and splendour masked a deeply embarrassing chapter in Sandhurst's history.
Only days ago, its Commandant, Major General Duncan Capps, felt obliged to expel no fewer than seven overseas cadets — all of them from the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

'The cadets' instructors got the boot too,' my man on parade tells me. 'It was because of what are described as 'disciplinary incidents'.'
Capps won't have taken such decisive action lightly, not least because of the diplomatic discomfort it will cause the Foreign Office — and because of the potential cost to the Treasury.

I can reveal that the parade-ground pomp and splendour masked a deeply embarrassing chapter in Sandhurst's history. Only days ago, its Commandant, Major General Duncan Capps, pictured in 2020, felt obliged to expel no fewer than seven overseas cadets — all of them from the United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Oil-rich countries pay handsomely for their links with Sandhurst; the UAE recently built a new accommodation block there, the Zayed Building, at a cost of £15 million.

The expulsions come at a time of fraught relations with the UAE. The ruler of Dubai was ordered to pay a record £554 million to his former wife and their two children by a British court last December. Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, a horse race-loving friend of the Royal Family, will have to pay for Princess Haya's security for the rest of her life after she fled to Britain to escape him.

It followed previous High Court judgments that the sheikh orchestrated the abductions of two of his daughters and used military-grade surveillance software to launch a phone-hacking operation on British soil. He has denied the findings.

At Sandhurst, there can be cultural differences between Arab princelings and British officer cadets.

 

Halifax Tar

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
2,769
Points
1,260
Streuth...


EDEN CONFIDENTIAL: Seven Sandhurst cadets and instructors from the UAE are expelled in scandal​


The Sovereign's Parade concluded in traditional manner at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst yesterday, albeit in the Queen's absence.
But I can reveal that the parade-ground pomp and splendour masked a deeply embarrassing chapter in Sandhurst's history.
Only days ago, its Commandant, Major General Duncan Capps, felt obliged to expel no fewer than seven overseas cadets — all of them from the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

'The cadets' instructors got the boot too,' my man on parade tells me. 'It was because of what are described as 'disciplinary incidents'.'
Capps won't have taken such decisive action lightly, not least because of the diplomatic discomfort it will cause the Foreign Office — and because of the potential cost to the Treasury.

I can reveal that the parade-ground pomp and splendour masked a deeply embarrassing chapter in Sandhurst's history. Only days ago, its Commandant, Major General Duncan Capps, pictured in 2020, felt obliged to expel no fewer than seven overseas cadets — all of them from the United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Oil-rich countries pay handsomely for their links with Sandhurst; the UAE recently built a new accommodation block there, the Zayed Building, at a cost of £15 million.

The expulsions come at a time of fraught relations with the UAE. The ruler of Dubai was ordered to pay a record £554 million to his former wife and their two children by a British court last December. Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, a horse race-loving friend of the Royal Family, will have to pay for Princess Haya's security for the rest of her life after she fled to Britain to escape him.

It followed previous High Court judgments that the sheikh orchestrated the abductions of two of his daughters and used military-grade surveillance software to launch a phone-hacking operation on British soil. He has denied the findings.

At Sandhurst, there can be cultural differences between Arab princelings and British officer cadets.


Best paragraph of the article:

The less impressive overseas cadets were, he adds, known as 'Floppies' – 'F****** lazy overseas potential enemies'. An Army spokesman declines to comment.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
13,039
Points
1,160
Best paragraph of the article:

As I recall a few 'non-overseas Cadets' could have fit nicely into that category too.

I really appreciated most of them.

Watching some kid from the Persian Gulf, Singapore, Belize or Central Africa lying in an ambush position in a forestry block in Sennybridge in December at oh-dark-hundred, suffer through his first snowstorm and still do his job, was an impressive display of character ;)
 

Blackadder1916

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,372
Points
1,160
As I recall a few 'non-overseas Cadets' could have fit nicely into that category too.

I really appreciated most of them.

Watching some kid from the Persian Gulf, Singapore, Belize or Central Africa lying in an ambush position in a forestry block in Sennybridge in December at oh-dark-hundred, suffer through his first snowstorm and still do his job, was an impressive display of character ;)

Memories.

On my course at CFOCS Chilliwack in the mid 1980s we had several foreign candidates (commonly referred to as Foreign Nationals or "FN" - the initials of which were also unfortunately applicable to a racial slur). Of the two that were in my platoon, one was from Belize who ended up in the same situation during the final ex, "EAGLE FLIGHT FLOP", early in December up the mountain during particularly harsh weather. He had been a LCpl before being selected for officer training and while he had some experience operating in the jungle, his previous knowledge of snow was seeing some white stuff on the top of mountains in the distance. He ended up as one of the cold injuries (hypothermia) requiring hospitalization. He also failed the course (though not because of the injury); while a nice guy who tried hard, he wasn't particularly bright. The other FN in our platoon (a female Log type from Jamaica) also failed the course, but she was a lazy cow who always complained about being there. She had wanted to do her officer training at Sandhurst and when informed of being failed, her response was "good, now they'll send me to Sandhurst".

A few years after CFOCS, I chanced to meet an officer from Belize who related that Sheldon (the Belizean OCdt) had been sent to Sandhurst after his Canadian adventure and had successfully completed the course. However, his opinion of Sheldon was much the same, amazement that he had passed even with Sandhurst's reputation of being somewhat lenient on foreign cadets. The Jamaican candidate also went to Sandhurst and completed the course.
 
Last edited:

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
4,412
Points
1,160
I did driver support for CFOCS Chilliwack back in the 80's we were going up the mountain and reached the snow line. The Tanzanian Cadet had never seen snow before and marvelled at it. He jokingly asked "Can I mail it home to my grandmother?".
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
13,039
Points
1,160
I did driver support for CFOCS Chilliwack back in the 80's we were going up the mountain and reached the snow line. The Tanzanian Cadet had never seen snow before and marvelled at it. He jokingly asked "Can I mail it home to my grandmother?".

We had a guy from Africa running around in the ambush admin area shouting 'What is this? What is this?' as the flakes drifted down on him.

As I was appointed the Pl 2IC for that scenario I felt that I had to 'subdue' him for the sake of the mission ;)

They all sucked it up and carried on though, Gawd bless 'em!
 

medicineman

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
807
Points
1,010
I recall they had to rearrange when African students were enrolled on the UNMO courses in Kingston due to snow apparently being bad juju for them...
 
Top