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C3 Howitzer Replacement

KevinB

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From the video I've seen of the Archer, the loading is done on a platform extending out of the ammo limber to the side of the gun where a relatively light hatch opens up to provide access for loading - it is not like the protected turret of the Paladin. And in fairness many, if not most of the US arty bns, remove the transfer conveyor from the M992 in favour of backing the M992 close to the back of the Paladin and passing the rounds and powder through the unarmoured space between the two vehicles.
I would suggest that is currently due to no real counter battery aspect of recent conflicts.
I suspect if the crews had a threat - they'd be doing everything they could to stay under armor.

I imagine one could design an armoured load bed with platform that has a decent level of ballistic protection around it. Betcha its not a high priority on anyone's agenda. Nonetheless the low number of on-board rounds severely limits the weight of fire that one gun can produce before it has to go out of action for a reload. That essentially means juggling the mission to another gun or guns. That's quite possible and that's what artillery is all about--massing fires across the AO--but still a limitation that needs to be factored in.

🍻
I guess it depends on if we are planning on peer/near peer threats - or just a cool toy for the Stryker Brigades.
I am concerned a lot of planning of late isn't paying attention to the effects that can occur in a peer/near peer conflict at the low levels - and only on the #'s and goals at a high level -- which builds an empty pyramid that isn't stable or robust and falls at first conflict.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Canada's plan is to confuse the enemy, forcing them to hunt for our artillery they assume we have. We have taken the lessons of Patton's First United States Army Group to heart.
 

Kirkhill

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C3 Replacement (Ballistic or Guided)


slammer.jpg


Self-Propelled version


images
 

Kirkhill

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The USMC has traded in their tanks and most of their guns.

Their new arsenal

Tomahawks
HiMARs (PrSMs)
NSMs
Hero-120 Loitering Attack Munitions
Hellfires (JAGMs)
Javelins (Anti-Tank and Anti-Structure)

And to make life more interesting

 

CBH99

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C3 Replacement (Ballistic or Guided)


slammer.jpg


Self-Propelled version


images
Yet another fleet meant for the Reserve Force that ends up being “borrowed permanently” by the Reg Force? 😅

At least they could be made domestically. And I’m sure those CRV7’s could be put back into production (did they even stop production?) now that they have a guided version. The entire platform, munitions & all, produced domestically.

Now what do we do with all those gunners milling about with nothing to do? Surely we can’t just let them stand around with their hands in their pockets…
 

Kirkhill

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Yet another fleet meant for the Reserve Force that ends up being “borrowed permanently” by the Reg Force? 😅

At least they could be made domestically. And I’m sure those CRV7’s could be put back into production (did they even stop production?) now that they have a guided version. The entire platform, munitions & all, produced domestically.

Now what do we do with all those gunners milling about with nothing to do? Surely we can’t just let them stand around with their hands in their pockets…

They are made domestically, in Winnipeg, by Magellan Aerospace of Mississauga.


They are used by the Brits and, apparently, many others.

In the RAF and Army Air Corps the rocket of choice is the CRV-7, a seemingly old fashioned and unglamorous weapon that nevertheless is massively effective, very low cost and frequently used.

The manufacturers of the CRV-7 (Bristol (Magellan) Aerospace of Canada) have developed a low cost precision version utilising a simple laser homing seeker head from Kongsberg, additional seeker heads include GPS and Anti Radiation.

The CRV7 no doubt is the best of breed and with the addition of a low cost semi active laser homing warhead it would provide a useful extra capability for limited vehicular and airborne (helicopter and UAV) launch, with a range of between 1 and 12km.

There is/was also a CRV-7 PG (Precision Guided) version made by Magellan in conjunction with Kongsberg and NAMMO. It was launched from a pair of three-packs on the Sea Protector RWS as well as a singleshot version from an ATV. Trialled by some secret squirrel types.

D1kCt01WsAIDa4j.jpg
D1kCt1BX4AMaez_.jpg


Which doesn't look a million miles away from this

images


A Canadian Rocket, in Canadian Pods, on a Canadian Vehicle assembled by a German Company in Quebec. 14 Ready rounds, plus the smoke grenade launcher in front.

And I can't help but wonder the effect of one of those converted M101 mounts with 6x 19 = 114 rounds, laser designated, each loaded with 80 tungsten flechettes, on a swarm of drones. And other soft targets.

The Argus mounted UGV for Company support.

The Field Mount for Battle Group support.

Contributing to the Anti-Armour, Anti-Vehicle, Anti-Personnel, Anti-Drone, Screening/Camouflaging Battles.




Tangent Alert

From Magellan's 2020 Annual Report

On December 10, 2020, Magellan announced the delivery of the 200th set of F-35 Lightning II horizontal stabilizer
assemblies under an agreement with BAE Systems. Magellan and BAE Systems have been working together to produce
horizontal stabilizers for the global F-35 program since 2009. Both companies have since made significant investment in
facilities, technologies and training to ensure the successful delivery of these flight-critical assemblies to the F-35 prime
contractor Lockheed Martin. The horizontal stabilizers produced at Magellan are major assemblies on the Conventional
Takeoff and Landing (CTOL) variant of the F-35. Magellan is targeting to produce more than 1,000 ship sets of horizontal
tail assemblies over the life of the F-35 program along with various other metallic and composite components.

On January 14, 2021, the Corporation announced that Raytheon Missiles & Defense (“Raytheon”) has awarded the
Corporation a contract for the supply of complex missile fin components. These heat-tolerant surface control assemblies
will be manufactured at Magellan’s facility in Middletown, Ohio, with deliveries starting in 2021 and continuing through
2024. The value of this agreement is approximately $61.4 million. Magellan has participated in the Standard Missile (“SM”)
program for more than 20 years, supplying dorsal fins for various configurations, including the SM-3 and SM-6.
These
defensive missiles provide area defence to the U.S. Military against theater ballistic missiles, aircraft and cruise missiles.

On February 8, 2021, Magellan announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”) with General Electric
Aviation Canada (“GE Canada”) for the purpose of exploring an arrangement whereby GE Canada would support Magellan
in establishing and delivering a Canadian-based sustainment solution for the GE F414-GE-400 engine, which powers

Boeing’s F/A-18 Block III Super Hornet fighter jet. This initiative is in support of Boeing’s proposal to provide the Block III
Super Hornet as a solution for Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project (“FFCP”). Under the MOU, with the selection
of the Super Hornet for the FFCP, GE Canada and Magellan would develop an appropriate and competitive sustainment
solution for Canada which would provide all aircraft engine sustainment services for the Royal Canadian Air Force on their
F414 engine fleet. The in-country depot level sustainment support for the engines includes onsite maintenance, repair and
overhaul support services, technical services, and engineering support and would be performed in Magellan’s facility in
Mississauga, Ontario for the life of the program.

Magellan, as Bristol Aerospace, is the Manitoba company that lost the F18 contract to Quebec, under Brian Mulroney, and launched the Reform Party.
 
Last edited:

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
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The USMC has traded in their tanks and most of their guns.

Their new arsenal

Tomahawks
HiMARs (PrSMs)
NSMs
Hero-120 Loitering Attack Munitions
Hellfires (JAGMs)
Javelins (Anti-Tank and Anti-Structure)

And to make life more interesting

Considering how starved of funds the USMC can be, it be interesting if they buy all the systems and stocks they need.
 

OldSolduer

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They are made domestically, in Winnipeg, by Magellan Aerospace of Mississauga.


They are used by the Brits and, apparently, many others.



There is/was also a CRV-7 PG (Precision Guided) version made by Magellan in conjunction with Kongsberg and NAMMO. It was launched from a pair of three-packs on the Sea Protector RWS as well as a singleshot version from an ATV. Trialled by some secret squirrel types.

D1kCt01WsAIDa4j.jpg
D1kCt1BX4AMaez_.jpg


Which doesn't look a million miles away from this

images


A Canadian Rocket, in Canadian Pods, on a Canadian Vehicle assembled by a German Company in Quebec. 14 Ready rounds, plus the smoke grenade launcher in front.

And I can't help but wonder the effect of one of those converted M101 mounts with 6x 19 = 114 rounds, laser designated, each loaded with 80 tungsten flechettes, on a swarm of drones. And other soft targets.

The Argus mounted UGV for Company support.

The Field Mount for Battle Group support.

Contributing to the Anti-Armour, Anti-Vehicle, Anti-Personnel, Anti-Drone, Screening/Camouflaging Battles.




Tangent Alert

From Magellan's 2020 Annual Report







Magellan, as Bristol Aerospace, is the Manitoba company that lost the F18 contract to Quebec, under Brian Mulroney, and launched the Reform Party.
I recall that - none too favorably.
 
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