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Defending Canadian Arctic Sovereignty

FJAG

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Continuing GR66's thought on alliances

185 Reserve Units
190 Ranger Patrols
I know that the 185 Reserve Units comes from an older CAF webpage but I think it's completely out to lunch.

The Army P Res has 115 Bn sized units (including arty, engr, sigs and service bns) and 10 Independent coys sized elements (incl arty and int) that may have unit status. There are an additional 4 MP Regiments and 15 H Svcs PRes units which do not belong to the Army. After that you have to start looking at 24 NavRes division and 3 AirRes squadrons and four flights. All of that combined isn't 185 Res F units

I'm not so sure of why you wish to share the misery joy of creating a large force of paid and unpaid personnel to take on both military and para or quasi military responsibilities when we can barely maintain 19,000 paid ones.

Japan is an excellent example of how the civilian population and volunteers are integrated into natural disaster programs. Canada has both federal and provincial Emergency Management organizations. It would behoove our government to leverage those systems with increased specialized and general service volunteers tailored to the most likely disasters specific to each district/region.

I know the Res F has once again started dabbling in the snakes and ladders field (I'm a victim and survivor of the 1960s Militia debacle) and quite frankly I'm agin' it. The Res F has little enough time and resources to become proficient in its military roles much less the personnel training and logistic requirements of HADR including the cat herding 90,000 volunteers. If the Army wants the Res F to be a pseudo ARNG then get them properly organized, equipped and trained in their military roles first.

The way the P Res functions now is dysfunctional. The suggested method is not only impractical but would gut any possibility of creating truly operational units. Sorry, IMHO, its a solution looking for a problem based on some vague European Landwehr concept that has basically died out.

🍻
 

daftandbarmy

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I know that the 185 Reserve Units comes from an older CAF webpage but I think it's completely out to lunch.

The Army P Res has 115 Bn sized units (including arty, engr, sigs and service bns) and 10 Independent coys sized elements (incl arty and int) that may have unit status. There are an additional 4 MP Regiments and 15 H Svcs PRes units which do not belong to the Army. After that you have to start looking at 24 NavRes division and 3 AirRes squadrons and four flights. All of that combined isn't 185 Res F units

I'm not so sure of why you wish to share the misery joy of creating a large force of paid and unpaid personnel to take on both military and para or quasi military responsibilities when we can barely maintain 19,000 paid ones.

Japan is an excellent example of how the civilian population and volunteers are integrated into natural disaster programs. Canada has both federal and provincial Emergency Management organizations. It would behoove our government to leverage those systems with increased specialized and general service volunteers tailored to the most likely disasters specific to each district/region.

I know the Res F has once again started dabbling in the snakes and ladders field (I'm a victim and survivor of the 1960s Militia debacle) and quite frankly I'm agin' it. The Res F has little enough time and resources to become proficient in its military roles much less the personnel training and logistic requirements of HADR including the cat herding 90,000 volunteers. If the Army wants the Res F to be a pseudo ARNG then get them properly organized, equipped and trained in their military roles first.

The way the P Res functions now is dysfunctional. The suggested method is not only impractical but would gut any possibility of creating truly operational units. Sorry, IMHO, its a solution looking for a problem based on some vague European Landwehr concept that has basically died out.

🍻

Over the past couple of decades the Reserves have already responded, admirably apparently, to a variety of OP LENTUS type domestic response operations.

There are always improvements that can be made, but are you sure we're not trying to fix a problem that doesn't exist... much?
 

FJAG

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Over the past couple of decades the Reserves have already responded, admirably apparently, to a variety of OP LENTUS type domestic response operations.

There are always improvements that can be made, but are you sure we're not trying to fix a problem that doesn't exist... much?
That's kind of where I am.

I think the Res F is doing enough (maybe even a bit much) for Op LENTUS without needing to do a whole lot of specialized preparation. Similarly I think they're doing enough in the way of Arctic response companies.

Where I don't think they are doing too well is in the preparation for general combat functions and that is a function of middlin' leadership, lack of equipment, inadequate organization and much wasted training time.

🍻
 

Colin Parkinson

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Good to see some long term thinking and work going on, short term pain for long term gain hopefully.
 

daftandbarmy

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Good to see some long term thinking and work going on, short term pain for long term gain hopefully.

Meanwhile, in the USA:

Everything In The $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill: New Roads, Electric School Buses, Great Lakes Restoration And More​


The House passed one of the largest infrastructure packages in U.S. history Friday night after months of bipartisan negotiations and tense political infighting, shoring up $1.2 trillion in funds, including $550 billion in new investments, for the nation's bridges, airports, waterways, public transit and more—here's everything you need to know about where the massive spending will go.

Roads and bridges: Headlining the 2,702-page bill's spending, roughly $110 billion of new funds would go toward improving the nation's roads and bridges, and investments in other major transportation programs.

Public transit: The package also includes the largest-ever federal investment in public transit, allotting $39 billion to modernize systems, improve access for the elderly and people with disabilities, and repair more than 24,000 buses, 5,000 rail cars and thousands of miles of train tracks.

Amtrak: The legislation marks the largest investment in passenger rail since the creation of Amtrak 50 years ago, with $66 billion earmarked for high-speed rail, safety improvements, Amtrak grants and to modernize the rail route connecting Washington, D.C., to Boston.

Broadband internet: Tacking on to billions authorized by last year's American Rescue Plan, the infrastructure bill includes $65 billion to bolster the country's broadband infrastructure and help ensure every American has access to high-speed internet, with one in four households expected to be eligible for a $30-per-month subsidy to pay for internet.

Electric grid: Though many clean-energy measures were cut from the bill to satisfy spending-weary lawmakers, a $65 billion investment will help upgrade the nation's electricity grid, with thousands of miles of new transmission lines and funds for environmentally friendly smart-grid technology.

Electric cars, buses and ferries: In addition to $7.5 billion for the nation's first network of electric-vehicle chargers along highway corridors, lawmakers have shored up $5 billion for zero-emission buses (including thousands of electric school buses) and $2.5 billion for ferries.
Clean drinking water: Following high-profile water-supply crises plaguing cities like Flint, Michigan, the legislation includes a provision for $55 billion to replace all the nation's lead pipes and service lines, representing the largest investment in clean drinking water ever.
Great rivers and lakes: Among the bill's $48 billion for water infrastructure improvements, about $1 billion is slated to go toward the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a sweeping clean-up measure targeting toxic hot spots—or areas of heavy industrial pollution—around the Great Lakes region.

Airports: More than $25 billion has been allocated to help modernize America's airports—funds the Airports Council International says will help tackle more than $115 billion worth of project backlogs.

Road safety: The deal invests $11 billion in transportation safety programs, including a new program to help states and localities reduce crashes and fatalities in their communities, particularly among cyclists and pedestrians.


 

Kirkhill

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Meanwhile, in the USA:

Everything In The $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill: New Roads, Electric School Buses, Great Lakes Restoration And More​


The House passed one of the largest infrastructure packages in U.S. history Friday night after months of bipartisan negotiations and tense political infighting, shoring up $1.2 trillion in funds, including $550 billion in new investments, for the nation's bridges, airports, waterways, public transit and more—here's everything you need to know about where the massive spending will go.

Roads and bridges: Headlining the 2,702-page bill's spending, roughly $110 billion of new funds would go toward improving the nation's roads and bridges, and investments in other major transportation programs.

Public transit: The package also includes the largest-ever federal investment in public transit, allotting $39 billion to modernize systems, improve access for the elderly and people with disabilities, and repair more than 24,000 buses, 5,000 rail cars and thousands of miles of train tracks.

Amtrak: The legislation marks the largest investment in passenger rail since the creation of Amtrak 50 years ago, with $66 billion earmarked for high-speed rail, safety improvements, Amtrak grants and to modernize the rail route connecting Washington, D.C., to Boston.

Broadband internet: Tacking on to billions authorized by last year's American Rescue Plan, the infrastructure bill includes $65 billion to bolster the country's broadband infrastructure and help ensure every American has access to high-speed internet, with one in four households expected to be eligible for a $30-per-month subsidy to pay for internet.

Electric grid: Though many clean-energy measures were cut from the bill to satisfy spending-weary lawmakers, a $65 billion investment will help upgrade the nation's electricity grid, with thousands of miles of new transmission lines and funds for environmentally friendly smart-grid technology.

Electric cars, buses and ferries: In addition to $7.5 billion for the nation's first network of electric-vehicle chargers along highway corridors, lawmakers have shored up $5 billion for zero-emission buses (including thousands of electric school buses) and $2.5 billion for ferries.
Clean drinking water: Following high-profile water-supply crises plaguing cities like Flint, Michigan, the legislation includes a provision for $55 billion to replace all the nation's lead pipes and service lines, representing the largest investment in clean drinking water ever.
Great rivers and lakes: Among the bill's $48 billion for water infrastructure improvements, about $1 billion is slated to go toward the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a sweeping clean-up measure targeting toxic hot spots—or areas of heavy industrial pollution—around the Great Lakes region.

Airports: More than $25 billion has been allocated to help modernize America's airports—funds the Airports Council International says will help tackle more than $115 billion worth of project backlogs.

Road safety: The deal invests $11 billion in transportation safety programs, including a new program to help states and localities reduce crashes and fatalities in their communities, particularly among cyclists and pedestrians.



Funny how before the Virginia election the headlines were about the 1.2 Trillion Dollar Plan and Joe Biden as FDR and JFK rolled into one.

Now, after the election, the headline number is only 550 Billion Dollars.

Either way, in a little while, we will soon be talking real money.
 

CBH99

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Likely won't result in problems, but i would not want to be a Canadian flagged ship travelling in Russian waters for now.

That has to suck for the crew and research staff, who end up caught in the middle of a legal battle between two corporate entities.

The crew are just there to crew the ship, and the researchers to measure and record what they think is important. None of these folks were necessarily even working for the company during the alleged grounding incident - yet get caught in the middle of it nonetheless.


I agree I wouldn’t want to be a Canadian flagged ship in Russian waters right around now. But I have a feeling that IF Russia retaliates in kind, they’ll be treated much better than if it were China.
 
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