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Executive Officer of HMCS Kingston relieved of her duties

daftandbarmy

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Or you know, allowing men and women to co-exist in the same room at the same time.

Shocked GIF by The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon
 

OldSolduer

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Collective punishment/prohibition is easier than dealing with individuals, I suppose.
That has been the trend since about 1993 - we had very few restrictions in Croatia in 1993.

When we deployed to Bosnia in 1997 it was two per day.
 

rmc_wannabe

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The problem is not the rules; it's the enforcement of them and , conversely, the perceived double standard between Private Soliders, Junior NCOs, Senior NCOs, Warrant Officers, and Officers of all grades.

If Cpl Bloggins is on CB for 14 days because he had 3 instead of 2 while on deployment, you better have Capt Bloggins next in front of the boss for doing the same.

I remember moving the WO/Officer accomodation tents (and baggage) out of a sinkhole on a Bde "dry" ex. We had just been told charges would follow for a Pte who has a flask. Imagine my surprise at how many clanking bottles I heard moving around barrack boxes, rucksacks, and kit bags from the same folks out for blood over a flask within the Other Ranks.

Until we hold those leaders to the same accountability standards we hold those they lead, cycle repeats itself and the headlines follow.
 

OldSolduer

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The problem is not the rules; it's the enforcement of them and , conversely, the perceived double standard between Private Soliders, Junior NCOs, Senior NCOs, Warrant Officers, and Officers of all grades.

If Cpl Bloggins is on CB for 14 days because he had 3 instead of 2 while on deployment, you better have Capt Bloggins next in front of the boss for doing the same.

I remember moving the WO/Officer accomodation tents (and baggage) out of a sinkhole on a Bde "dry" ex. We had just been told charges would follow for a Pte who has a flask. Imagine my surprise at how many clanking bottles I heard moving around barrack boxes, rucksacks, and kit bags from the same folks out for blood over a flask within the Other Ranks.

Until we hold those leaders to the same accountability standards we hold those they lead, cycle repeats itself and the headlines follow.
I agree with you on this. I know in my last unit in the Reg Force NCOs and WOs were expected to lead by example OR suffer the wrath of Niner.
 

lenaitch

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X could be a lot of things. Collective punishment/prohibition is easier than dealing with individuals, I suppose.
So goes just about every government response to an incident. It's just so much easier to slap with a broad brush than dealing with actual, you know, people. Dealing with an individual might attract attention, and framing the response as solving widespread systemic problems is probably good for a bonus or promotion.
 

rmc_wannabe

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So goes just about every government response to an incident. It's just so much easier to slap with a broad brush than dealing with actual, you know, people. Dealing with an individual might attract attention, and framing the response as solving widespread systemic problems is probably good for a bonus or promotion.
What is it they say? "Zero tolerance is the policy of the lazy; in that it fixes everything by doing nothing(?)"
 

OldSolduer

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What is it they say? "Zero tolerance is the policy of the lazy; in that it fixes everything by doing nothing(?)"
"Zero tolerance" is laughable. There is no such thing. If we had "Zero tolerance" for domestic violence our jails would be overflowing. AND less women would be murdered by there partners.
 

Brad Sallows

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We'd be much safer if people mostly did nothing. Short of that, excuses for prohibitions serve other agendas.
 

dimsum

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At what point in the past few decades did we disconnect from the society in which adults could manage to keep small wet bars in offices without becoming deranged?
More so that said derangement wasn't swept under the rug anymore.
 

Halifax Tar

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No, it was back in around 2015/2016, so drinking at sea wasn't allowed at all (which is fine), but someone at CJOC decided that anyone on a CJOC deployment had restrictions even while off duty. I think it only lasted about a year or so, so probably someone getting posted in/out trying to make their mark.

Maybe that made sense from an Army side, if you are thinking about soldiers on a base or something, but sailors sitting in Greece on a weekend off it was a bit silly.

Honestly people generally respected it if they were on board or coming back to the ship (at least the intent, maybe not the rule). Didn't really ask many questions for the people that went out in a group and rented a hotel room or whatever, but aside from the Christmas VIP visit a the very end, and a bit of a shitshow with the Danish ship alongside together, was pretty much an incident free 7 months from an alcohol incident perspective. Some people still missed the brow closing or otherwise did some stupid things but was a lot better compared to normal foreign port visits.

Ya it was around then. I deployed in FRE for an Op Reassurance in 2016 and we were two drinks per day alongside and nil at sea.

DCox'n watches were so much fun during that trip...

But in some cases, Niner was the problem.
View attachment 74018

Who is that ?
 
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