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Maritime Officer Selection Test ( MOST ) - merged

da1root

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Please check out the following Threads.

Maritime Officer Selection Test 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/51566.0

MOST sample questions?
https://army.ca/forums/threads/119636.0

'MOST' aptitude exam for MARS officer applicants 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/118541.0
 

airwin

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Given the Merit List thread is locked, I am hoping this is a suitable area to post my question.  I have written the MOST and am awaiting medical and background to return.  I understand that many factors make up your position on the merit list, but am curious what percentage weighting would be given to trade specific aptitude testing (ie Interview 25%, CFAT 25%, MOST 50%).  If one of our more knowledgable contributors is able to shed any light on this I would greatly appreciate.
 
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Navy_Pete said:
If that the same as what they used to do on NOAB, where you have to navigate from point A to B on a grid, where they add one rule each time you turn the page to a slightly different layout, but you can't look back at the previous rules and only had so much time each page?  If so, not something you can study for.  Basically you just need to go in there fresh, try and remember what you can, and if all else fails make a decision and answer everything within the allowed time.

I think it was as much a stress test as it was an aptitude test, and some people just fell apart on it (which is really what basic training is).

Too bad they got rid of the NOAB entrance screening, it was excellent; saved us from pumping millions into training people that shouldn't have gotten through basic.

That is what it was exactly, very basic after I completed it. Most difficult part was doing some basic calculations in my head.
 

AlAB

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I took the MOST recently and just want to add to the general knowledge in this thread, because it was helpful for me but is missing a bit of information on the "how to prepare" side of things.

Navy_Pete's comment is accurate. The MOST presents a lot of questions in a very short space of time. Even though you can study for most aptitude tests (include the CFAT), this is one test where even if I knew the type of questions beforehand I still wouldn't have been able to study effectively. As such, success is largely about your ability to remain calm under stress and analyze and answer questions quickly. In some ways it's a test of how good you are at taking tests. Therefore the best prep you can do is making sure you're on top of your test-taking skills:

- Don't panic. Don't be intimidated by how little time you have. Put your head down and get to work as soon the clock starts running.
- Keep a really close eye on the clock. Calculate in your head how much time you have for each question. Get in a rhythm. If you find yourself behind schedule, move on and move faster.
- If a question is too hard, guess - come back at the end if you have time. You probably won't have time.
- Some questions are harder than others. As far as I know, all questions are weighted equally.
- If you feel like you're failing, do NOT give up and do not let it phase you. Continue to try your hardest.
 

gazorpazorpfield

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I've been scheduled to take the MOST in a few days. I've been practising mental math, SDT calculations and Lumosity. I've heard that the there's also a Passage Planning Test portion in the MOST. Is there a resource to prepare for that?
 

AlAB

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SDT calculations and mental math are good to practice, but don't overdo it. Unfortunately there are no publicly available preparation resources.

Seriously, don't sweat it. If you did well enough on the CFAT to get to this point you will almost certainly do fine on the MOST. The questions themselves aren't hard, there are just a lot of them and not enough time. The most important pieces of advice I can give are don't panic and don't give up. The pass threshold is not public information but suffice to say never count yourself out.
 

Humphrey Bogart

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Don't sweat the test.  I wrote the MOST a month and a half ago.  I'm a current serving Infantry Officer in the process of a remuster to NWO and tbh, the hardest part was simply putting myself out there knowing I could fail and thinking about what all the naysayers would say if I did.

I imagine it's the same for a new person joining the CAF.  My advice is to take your time and relax.  Don't expect to get a 100%, trust me, you won't.
 

gazorpazorpfield

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Humphrey Bogart said:
Don't sweat the test.  I wrote the MOST a month and a half ago.  I'm a current serving Infantry Officer in the process of a remuster to NWO and tbh, the hardest part was simply putting myself out there knowing I could fail and thinking about what all the naysayers would say if I did.

I imagine it's the same for a new person joining the CAF.  My advice is to take your time and relax.  Don't expect to get a 100%, trust me, you won't.

AlAB said:
SDT calculations and mental math are good to practice, but don't overdo it. Unfortunately there are no publicly available preparation resources.

Seriously, don't sweat it. If you did well enough on the CFAT to get to this point you will almost certainly do fine on the MOST. The questions themselves aren't hard, there are just a lot of them and not enough time. The most important pieces of advice I can give are don't panic and don't give up. The pass threshold is not public information but suffice to say never count yourself out.

Thanks guys, I feel a bit more confident now! Still doing SDT and Lumosity cause they're fun to do and I'm aiming to go in there sharp as a tack :D
 

gazorpazorpfield

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miosam said:
Is the MOST test multiple choice or written?
https://bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.com/military-training/canadian-armed-forces-caf/canadian-armed-forces-caf-recruitment-selection-overview/
This is the most helpful resource i found about the MOST(look for that section in the page). Cant really talk about it any further but all the advice on this thread is spot on. Good luck.
 

miosam

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Do I need to know all the nautical terminology there is out there for this test?
 

Lumber

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miosam said:
Do I need to know all the nautical terminology there is out there for this test?

Look, scuttlebutt is that after splicing the mainbrace during the halfway banyan, some of the ping bosns went a bit too far with the moose milk, seeing as one of them was swallowing the anchor, and they ended up making a mess all over of the leeward side of the quaterdeck. So, the Coxn closed-up the three killicks well before wakey wakey and had them cleaning the heads and flats right up to dinner. Well wasn't he miffed when he found one of them sculling about the sail loft, his ass made fast to pile of spare mustang jackets like it was bloody Sunday routine. That one ended up at defaulters and spent the rest of the deployment on a 1-in-3 with the dogs married spending one of his off watches every day cleaning FOD from the bullring to the transom.

If you understood all of that, you're not ready for the Navy; you're already in the Navy.
 

Humphrey Bogart

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Lumber said:
Look, scuttlebutt is that after splicing the mainbrace during the halfway banyan, some of the ping bosns went a bit too far with the moose milk, seeing as one of them was swallowing the anchor, and they ended up making a mess all over of the leeward side of the quaterdeck. So, the Coxn closed-up the three killicks well before wakey wakey and had them cleaning the heads and flats right up to dinner. Well wasn't he miffed when he found one of them sculling about the sail loft, his *** made fast to pile of spare mustang jackets like it was bloody Sunday routine. That one ended up at defaulters and spent the rest of the deployment on a 1-in-3 with the dogs married spending one of his off watches every day cleaning FOD from the bullring to the transom.

If you understood all of that, you're not ready for the Navy; you're already in the Navy.

Hahahaha!


The test is a stress test, you either pass it or you don't.  Studying won't really help you.

 

Oldgateboatdriver

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Lumber: I think you missed a bit: Did the killick end up at defaulters with or without going before the mast, or was it just mess deck justice?


Inquiring minds want to know.  ;D
 

FSTO

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Oldgateboatdriver said:
Lumber: I think you missed a bit: Did the killick end up at defaulters with or without going before the mast, or was it just mess deck justice?


Inquiring minds want to know.  ;D

Tiller flats divisional interview?
 

Lumber

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His mess mother was a lower deck lawyer, so he managed to keep his conduct sheets crispy clean. Turns out the person who initially found him was a stoker who was himself three sheets to the wind at the time and wasn't a credible witness. That's not to say he got off easy. They were crossing the pond in the middle of the winter, and the focsle was cold enough to squeeze the cannon balls off a brass monkey, not that top part ship was much nicer. I tell ya, there's not enough duff in the whole larder that you could give me to be in his position.
 

Oldgateboatdriver

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Well! At least he wasn't flogged round the fleet, keelhauled or exiled to the bowsprit! 

I think we've beaten this dead horse enough, to quote army people.  ;D
 

Edward Campbell

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Lumber said:
Look, scuttlebutt is that after splicing the mainbrace during the halfway banyan, some of the ping bosns went a bit too far with the moose milk, seeing as one of them was swallowing the anchor, and they ended up making a mess all over of the leeward side of the quaterdeck. So, the Coxn closed-up the three killicks well before wakey wakey and had them cleaning the heads and flats right up to dinner. Well wasn't he miffed when he found one of them sculling about the sail loft, his ass made fast to pile of spare mustang jackets like it was bloody Sunday routine. That one ended up at defaulters and spent the rest of the deployment on a 1-in-3 with the dogs married spending one of his off watches every day cleaning FOD from the bullring to the transom.

If you understood all of that, you're not ready for the Navy; you're already in the Navy.


Somewhere in the deep, dark recesses of what's left of my mind I recall Art Hunter* telling us that defaulters were called something like "five and eight men," is that right, can someone explain?

_____
* Old, old RCR company commander as a captain (Art was a damned fine soldier but kept messing up the Capt to Maj exams) who was an ex-sailor ... he infamously (at a place called Haltern where we did still water swimming (of armoured personnel carriers every spring) put 15+ of his company's APC in the water at once and then sent the armoured cargo carrier past them, issuing gas cans and called it "fleet refuelling." The CO (Blake Baile for those who recall him) came upon it (as planned) and didn't know whether to shit, die or turn to page three ... Art would have been in serious difficulty if Blake could have managed to keep a straight face.
 
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