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New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy

Navy_Pete

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Clearly the answer is Nuclear power…
Really more about the short term power demands and things like cooling, not the actual power generation.

The boffins are looking at different options, but really depends on the actual laser power requirements, as well as parallel advances in solid state electronics. Big battery banks are their own risk, and for good reason, some safety issues around them on combatants still need to be figured out.

Power System and Energy Storage Models for Laser
Integration on Naval Platforms

https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/AD1014946.pdf
 

Kirkhill

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Lasers seem to be in the same power band as typical industrial motors - 20 to 300 kW.

The US Army is integrating a 20 kW-class laser weapon system into its new Infantry Squad Vehicle (ISV) to help soldiers down smaller unmanned aerial systems (UASs), according to the director of the service's Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office Lieutenant General Neil Thurgood.


The Directed Energy Maneuver Short Range Air Defense (DE M-SHORAD) system is a 50-kilowatt laser weapon mounted on a Stryker infantry carrier vehicle. Instead of a Stinger missile, think of a high powered beam of energy directed at a target.


There was exciting news for the US Navy last week as it was announced that Lockheed Martin finally delivered the 60+ kW-class high-energy laser with integrated optical-dazzler and surveillance (HELIOS), the first tactical laser weapon system to be integrated into existing ships. The weapon is also capable of providing directed energy capability to the fleet.


Giant US defense contractor Lockheed Martin says it has delivered a 300 kW electrically driven laser - the most powerful it has ever produced - for weapons demonstration efforts by the US Army.


Harry De Wolfs have four 3600 kW generators. 25% of that power, 1 generator, would power 12 of the highest energy lasers currently available.
 

Good2Golf

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Lasers seem to be in the same power band as typical industrial motors - 20 to 300 kW.













Harry De Wolfs have four 3600 kW generators. 25% of that power, 1 generator, would power 12 of the highest energy lasers currently available.
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that would make for some awesome SOVPATs!
 

Navy_Pete

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Harry De Wolfs have four 3600 kW generators. 25% of that power, 1 generator, would power 12 of the highest energy lasers currently available.
It's not the power, it's the instantaneous demand requirement and cycle time, which is why they use batteries/capacitors that need recharged. 30 kW delivered in a fraction of a second is completely different than over a few minutes.

You can have the same amount of energy in a bucket of fuel and some explosives, but they each have different applications. Same idea here.
 

Lumber

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Also, there's a limited window of utility for lasers. Once countries start making the exterior of their missiles and UAVs out of mirrors, the gig is up!
 

Kirkhill

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Also, there's a limited window of utility for lasers. Once countries start making the exterior of their missiles and UAVs out of mirrors, the gig is up!

Like these?


 

Underway

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Also, there's a limited window of utility for lasers. Once countries start making the exterior of their missiles and UAVs out of mirrors, the gig is up!
Not just that, ceramic coatings would degrade the heating properties of lasers significantly. Tiles from the space shuttle for would essentially make a target invlunerable to laser damage in that area. Engineering challenges there for sure though. You'd have to keep sensors free from ceramics (which can block EM quite well), and being tough but brittle their material properties are not ideal for aircraft.

It's not the power, it's the instantaneous demand requirement and cycle time, which is why they use batteries/capacitors that need recharged. 30 kW delivered in a fraction of a second is completely different than over a few minutes.

You can have the same amount of energy in a bucket of fuel and some explosives, but they each have different applications. Same idea here.

Completely agree with this. The power draw may be much higher then just a continuous load DG can provide. This is one of the flaws of the railgun system, where you needed to charge capacitors before firing, reducing the continuous firing rate. I wouldn't be surprised in the future if a laser system had its own dedicated DG to keep the load high enough to rapidly charge batteries/capacitors continuously in a combat situation.
 
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